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October- Info Required IRA members

Hello,
My name is John Paul and am from Derry, Am looking to research Dick Mc Kee who was involved in the Irish Bulletin, a news-sheet produced by Dáil Éireann’s Department of Publicity, Dick McKee, the IRA Commandant of the Dublin Brigade. Am led to believe that i have a family connection with him and i was hoping you could point me in the right direction as to where i can research this further as am very interested in this, i’ve also been given a photo is which my grandad is supposed to be in, it shows the portobello army in 1922, any help our information on where i can research this further would be off great help

Thank you

John Paul

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Micheal douglas and willie douglas(his brother) in their na fianna uniforms (aged 12-13) also as young men in different uniforms. My granddad took part in the raid on Monks Bakery (kevin baryy) and I printed evidence of this. Would it be something that you would be interested in. My dad is still alive 80 years and he tells stories of how is dad was in Ballykinler interment camp how do we get info on this. Also we have a picture of my grandad in a parade of men carrying out a gun salute at a funeral. My grandad died in 1952 so it would be pre that era ?

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My brotherinlaw Kevin Barrett. nephew ofDick Barrett executed in 1922 lives inLondon

and has asked me to find,if possible living relatives of Liam Mellows .Kevin like myself is in his 80.s and though he has been to Mountjoy recently he has not been sccessful. He himself is from West Cork and believes Mellows also had connections there.
I would be most greatful if you could helpme or point me in the right direction,
Mise le meas Lucás O’Cuinneagáin Grange Cottage Holycross Co Tipp. 0504 43985

Hello,
I am trying to find out some info regarding my great grandfather, Dominick McSloy. I was recently given his service medal by my mother and I would like to have it mounted for display but I know nothing about him. I would greatly appreciate any help you could give me regarding this. I found him in the 1911 census living in ardboe, Co Tyrone aged 23 but i have nothing beyond that.
Thank you in advance for any info or

——————————————————————————————George George Gilmore.

George was my first cousin  once removed (My Dads first cousin)  my dad grew up with George in Howth, but then we moved to UK from Ireland, and although I met George a couple of times when on Holiday in Ireland, I was very young so didn’t get to know him very well..

My Grandson came across his name in history at school recently. and asked me about him,

What sort of man he was really, etc.  also could you tell me why his mother went to prison. She was my Great Aunt, Frances Gilmore (Nee Angus ) known as Fanny.

Where can I get any of his poems, and find the play he wrote for his fiancé Cora Hughes? Also I believe he was something of an artist. are any of his paintings still around anywhere.

I would love as much information about him as is possible.

Regards,

Heather Graham (Mrs)

PS, I’d love some photo’s of George as I don’t remember really what he looked like  with being so young myself.

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Is there anyway of tracing details on volunteers?

I have just been given my grandfathers black and tan medal and wanted to know if there were any details on him. His name is Patrick Byrne,Doolistown,trim,co meath.

I hope you may be able to help

Regards Sean

—————————————————————————————————————————————-Could you  please tell me if Seán Hales married and to whom did he marry, and where is he burried.
Thanking you for any information yiu can give us.
Mervyn Hales.

—————————————————————————————————————————————–delighted to hear about this new book and looking forward to reading it soon…would anyone have any information on Martin Jennings (my Fathers uncle) who was attached to Tara Street Fire Station around 1920,  would be great to hear about him, maybe a photo ?   thank you….

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I’m interested in finding out more about item no3 (the FS soldiers killed by a mine near Macroom, Co Cork) as Capt Dan O’Brien was a GrandUncle of mine (his sister would have been my paternal grandmother) and was also from Macroom.     Incidentally, both my grandfather and late father were dentists in the Army as well.

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My father William Keane and his brother Sean were active serving members of E Company 6th Batt. old IRA.
I would love to see any pics or information you have about the period.
Recently I got a copy of my fathers old IRA pension application form and it makes interesting reading ,also have some pics of the company .

regds,    Brendan Keane.

I wish to know what information you would have for my Grandfather Peter Joseph Doran who was in “Second Batalion” Ref. S.P.9191/A623 also U/3883
Bset regards. Tony

——————————————————————————————-I have found out that St Michael’s Cemetery is in Cashel Road, Tipperary Town.
I have also found out that Patrick Hackett is buried in Drangan.
I believe there is a plaque on the ground in memorial to Hackett/Fleming/Clancy
but does anyone know where it is please?
Presumably in the Drangan area?
Any info greatly appreciated

—————————————————————————————————————————————I’m looking for details of John Scanlan, Garraunboy, Killaloe, Co. Clare who was on hunger strike in Wormwood Scrubbs in 1920.
Any info. greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

—————————————————————————————————————————————-My father’s cousins John and James Kelly were both IRA in East Cork during the War of Independence but took opposing sides in the Civil War, John for the Free State and James for the IRA. James left Ireland for the USA after the Civil War and never returned. In the 1970’s his descendants tried to get in touch with my father to no avail. Haven’t a clue who they were or where they are in the USA.  Would like to get in touch if there is anyone out there related to me.

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BLOODY SUNDAY” Dublin ,November 21, 1920

Bloody Sunday was one of the most significant events to take place during the Irish War of Independence,, which followed the formation of a unilaterally declared Irish Republic,and its parliament, Dail Eireann. The army of the republic, the Irish Republican Army waged a guerrilla war against the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC), its auxiliary organisations and the British Army,, who were tasked with suppressing the Irish liberation movement. Some members of the GAA which owned Croke Park were confirmed Nationalists, but others were not.

In response to IRA actions, the British Government formed paramilitary forces to augment the RIC, the “Black & Tans” (a nickname possibly arising from their mixture of uniforms), and the Auxiliary Division (generally known as the Auxiliaries or Auxies). The behaviour of both groups immediately became controversial (one major critic was King GeorgeV) for their brutality and violence, not just towards IRA suspects and prisoners but towards Irish people in general. In Dublin, the war largely took the form of assassinations and reprisals on either side.

The events on the morning of 21 November were an effort by the IRA in Dublin, under Michael Collins and Richard Mulcahy to wipe out the British intelligence organisation in the city.

Since 1919, Irish Finance Minister, head of the secretive Irish Republican Brotherhood and IRA Chief of Intelligence Michael Collins had operated a clandestine squad of IRA members in Dublin (a.k.a. “The Twelve Apostles”), which was used to assassinate RIC and British Intelligence officers. By late 1920, British Intelligence in Dublin, including what was known as the “Cairo Gang” (the nickname came from their patronage of the Cairo Cafe on Grafton Street and from their service in British military intelligence in Egypt and Palestine during the first world war),eighteen high-ranking British Intelligence officers, had established an extensive network of spies and informers around the city. Mulcahy, the IRA Chief of Staff, described it as, “a very dangerous and cleverly placed spy organisation”.

In November 1920, Collins ordered the assassination of British agents around the city, judging that if they did not do this, the IRA’s organisation in the capital would be in grave danger. The IRA was also of the opinion that a coordinated policy of assassination of leading republicans was being implemented by members of the security services. Dick McKee was put in charge of planning the operation. The addresses of the British agents were discovered from a variety of sources, including sympathetic housemaids, careless talk from some of the British, and an IRA informant in the RIC (Sergeant Mannix) based in Donnybrook barracks. On November 20, the assassination teams, which included the Squad and members of the IRA’s Dublin Brigade, were briefed on their targets, who included 20 agents at eight different locations in Dublin.Collins’s plan had been to kill over 50 British intelligence officers and informers, but the list was reduced to 35 on the insistence of Cathal Brugha, the Irish Minister for Defence, on the grounds that there was insufficient evidence against some of those named.

Early on the morning of 21 November, the IRA teams mounted the operation. Most of the killings occurred within a small middle-class area of south inner-city Dublin, with the exception of one shooting at the Gresham Hotel on o’Connell street. At 28 Upper Pembroke Street, four agents were killed. At 22 Lower Mount Street, one British officer was killed and another narrowly escaped. The building was surrounded by Auxiliaries, alerted by the firing, and in the ensuing gun fight two Auxiliaries were killed and one IRA man, Frank Teeling, was wounded and captured. Future Irish Taoiseach,Sean lemass was involved in the killing of a Captain Bagely, also on Mount Street, while in two further incidents on the same street three more British agents were killed. Only a few streets away, further shootings took place on Baggot Street, Fitzwilliam street, Morehampton Road and Earlsfort Terrace.

In all, 13 people were killed and 6 wounded, including suspected agents and those with no connection to politics, and two Auxilaries. Four of the British casualties were military intelligence officers and another four were Secret Service or Mi5 agents. Only one Squad member was captured, Frank Teeling, and he managed to quickly escape from gaol.One more IRA man was slightly wounded in the hand. However, out of the 35 people on Collins’ hit list, only about a third had been killed. IRA man and future Irish politician, Todd Andrews recalled later, “the fact is that the majority of the IRA raids were abortive. The men sought were not in their digs or in several cases, the men looking for them bungled their jobs”.Nevertheless the action terrified and crippled British intelligence in Ireland, causing many other agents and informers to flee for Dublin Castle, and caused consternation in the British administration.

Collins justified the killings in this way:

My one intention was the destruction of the undesirables who continued to make miserable the lives of ordinary decent citizens. I have proof enough to assure myself of the atrocities which this gang of spies and informers have committed. If I had a second motive it was no more than a feeling such as I would have for a dangerous reptile. By their destruction the very air is made sweeter. For myself, my conscience is clear. There is no crime in detecting in wartime the spy and the informer. They have destroyed without trial. I have paid them back in their own coin.

Below is an article by Irish Volunteer member Chris Keane,
http://irishvolunteers.org/2012/02/bloody-sunday-dublin-november-21-1920/